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November 28, 2008

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timbone

Paul, I found a link to a press release on the Guardian.co.uk The article was about Damian Green. I know the press release link is a different subject, but it was referred to because it is another case of something which a government does not want to make public. Please will you have a look. Thank you.

http://www.pr-inside.com/serious-questions-need-answering-in-r941760.htm

Graham Marlowe

Quite the most sickening aspect of this case recently was the oleaginous Peter Mandelson giving us a sanctimonious lecture on the Today programme this morning (Decemeber 3rd) about "law breaking".

Mandelson made a false declaration on a mortgage form in 1998.

That broke the law, too.

Stop using American spelling...

Whatever one thinks of the Ruth Turner arrest, it did at least send out a message that trying to subvert democracy for cash was something of which a dim view would be taken.

However, one could understand slightly better the 'sledgehammer to crack a nut' arrest of Mr Damian Green if Labour had not been so woefully hypocritical in dropping the BAE Systems investigation, and valued political expediency over justice by chucking the Serious Fraud Office off the case.

Paul Flynn

No Mr Davidson, you are so over the top, you are in outer space. Paranoia unlimited

GrahamMarlow

I was listening to Geoff Hoon (a man who makes up in pompousity and self-importance what he lacks in competence) on Any Questions yesterday where he just said it "was a matter for the police" and he was more or less parroted by Jacqui Smith this morning.

It seems to be a weekend for sanctimonious outpourings from New Labour Blairites: the sour looking and sounding Fiona McTaggart was tearing Evan harris (Lib Dem MP) yesterday morning on Today about prostitution.

It must be wonderful to be as perfect as the Blairites!

Alexander Davidson

New Labour, New Stasi.

Think about it Mr Flynn.

Paul Flynn

I was an opposition MP for ten years,Kay Tie. The point I am trying to make is not to equate an official with an MP, but to recall that the media gloated over the police abuse of their powers in the Turner/Lord Levy cases.

There was no press outcry then, even against the dawn raids and possible collusion between press and police. Compare and contrast today's hysteria. Stalin? Zimbabwe?.... a tad over the top when the Tories are being arrested.

Thanks for you comment about Tam - a great parliamentarian. It's a bit premature to sharpen the pitchforks. The police must be sorted out.

Kay Tie

"Speaking of the whole Turner/Levy saga"

Much as Paul would like to equate a party worker with an elected MP and shadow minister, the two situations are entirely different.

Paul ought to know that nothing lasts forever and he may one day be an opposition MP. Will he then feel totally confident that a future Tory government would never send the Met round to rip up his office looking for useful information? Maybe he can't imagine it, but I can see a smug future Home Secretary denying all responsibility for why a Labour MP has been held in a police cell for a week on suspicion of links to terrorism, citing the actions of "the Labour Government of 1997-2010" as precedent.

Graham Marlowe

"Tony Blair gave Ms Turner, one of his closest aides, his full backing. Ruth is a person of the highest integrity for whom I have great regard and I continue to have complete confidence in her," said the prime minister."

The trouble is, an endorsement from a practisced liar isn't much of a recommendation, is it?


Speaking of the whole Turner/Levy saga, why has nothing more been heard about the Abrahams affair, where that apparently intelligent man didn't realise it is an offence to make donations giving the names and addresses of people other than himself?. No doubt, being a rich man, he will escape any form of prosecution?

Kay Tie

Tam took up a campaign of mine once and I have nothing but respect for the man. He is a shining example of what an MP should be like. It's a pity he's not in the house now.

If Tam Dayell had been arrested and his Parliamentary office violated by the police under the Thatcher Government, you and I would have marched on Whitehall with pitchforks and blazing torches. In the year 2008, when Tam's party is in power, what should we do now? What are you going do?

I find it difficult to believe that the party of Tam Dayell, of Chris Mullins, can tolerate the authoritarianism. Can Labour MPs not see these powers will be used to crush their opposition when they are no longer in office?

Paul Flynn

Will S, I looked at Tom Harris's blog and discovered this very useful reminder of a similar situation:-


"In the aftermath of the Falklands war, civil servant Clive Ponting was arrested and charged under the Official Secrets Act for leaking information about the sinking of the Argentinian ship, the Belgrano. He was acquitted, mainly because the person to whom he had leaked the information was not a journalist but an MP, Labour’s Tam Dalyell, who subsequently used the information to attack the government.

So, as I understand the law, there is already some precedent for trusting MPs with sensitive information which, in others’ hands, would provoke more serious action. Having said that, MPs, of course, cannot be entirely immune from investigation."

In spite of the over the top reaction from Tory blogs, this is still an outrage. MPs will have a great deal to say next week.

Kay Tie

You might also wish to add Sally Murrer to the list. The judge in her case yesterday terminated the trial because of human rights abuses by Thames Valley Police. She was prosecuted for receiving leaked information about bugging of an MP in prison visits.

The executive - and their enforcers - are out of control. Paul, you need to do your job and bring them to heel. You could start by electing a speaker with a spine.

Graham Marlowe

I must admit Paul, I wondered if this had anything to do with the final day in office of the hapless Ian Blair. A sort of "tit for tat". Ian Blair is the tattiest of them all - he should have resigned after the Stockwell killing, but decided to hang on like dirty glue.

It seems to me that (Tony) Blair and Blunkett started the police state in this ountry, and it is being ardwently continued by Brown and that po-faced schoolmarm Jacqui Smith.

There are times I have to pinch myself to remind myself that we have a "Labour" government!

Will S

I'm glad you're not being party political about this. Unlike some crazy Conservatives and Libertarians. And I'm a Tory myself!

Oh, and throw something at Tom Harris for me, will you?

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