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June 21, 2007

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Keith at Tregenna

Memorial will commemorate Newport boy seaman

Friday 16th December 2011

http://www.southwalesargus.co.uk/news/9424858.Memorial_will_commemorate_Newport_boy_seaman/

THEY found his body two days after the explosion, blown into a previously unsearched area by its force.

From the ship, the body was taken ashore and buried in the British Cemetery at Ben M’Sik at Casablanca, on the road to Marrakesh.

Raymond Steed was just 14 years and 207 days old.

Raymond as all others should be remembered: there were many, little is known of most. May a tribute to him, help us all to remember all that perished, that we survive.

“Newport’s story is bound up with the sea. The city is here because of the port.

“In all that long story, Raymond Steed’s is one of the most poignant chapters.”

LINK:

http://www.southwalesargus.co.uk/news/9424858.Memorial_will_commemorate_Newport_boy_seaman/


ROYSTON CHAMBERS

jUST CAME ACCROSS THESE PAGES BY ACCIDENT VERY INTERESTING 2 QUESTIONS CAN YOU REVEAL OF "EMPIRE TOWER"ANNCREW MEMBER TROM NEWEY. AND I AM TRYING TO LOCATE A BOOK ABOUT A COUPLE OF LOCAL SEAMEN NOT SURE OF THE TITLE COULD INCLUDE "DONKEYS BREAFAST" WOULD APPRECIATE ANY HELP.

Lashandra

Good night, Happy Veteran's Day!

We only need to wish America's twenty six million old soldiers a very happy Veteran's Day. Also lets me quote Veterans Day quote which I actually like:

"Those who cannot bravely face danger are the slaves of their attackers . = Aristotle"... .

As an example if you actually want additional info about Veterans Day celebrations, savings, it's History, pictures plus much more, Military.com has a powerful internet based archive with everything else to help you...

Billy McGee

----- Original Message -----
From: Tim Brown
To: billy1963@ntlworld.com
Cc: ranald.leask@cwgc.org
Sent: Friday, December 18, 2009 4:03 PM
Subject: COMMEMORATION OF BOY REGINALD EARNSHAW

Dear Mr McGee

I have now taken over Peter’s responsibilities. Just one of the case files which Peter has passed onto me is that of Boy Reginald Earnshaw.

I can confirm that the certification provided is sufficient for us to add “Age 14” to our records. As far as I am aware, this would indeed make Reginald the youngest known service death of the 1939-1945 war.

Naturally, we will have to amend the headstone but this also presents the opportunity to offer the step sister (being a blood relative) the choice of a personal inscription, should she so wish, which can be engraved at the foot of the headstone. The inscription should be no more than 25 letters and spaces per line with a maximum number of 4 lines being available.

We will write separately to the step sister, Pauline Harvey, on this matter but it seems likely that any additional engraving required on the headstone will necessitate its removal at some stage for the work to be carried out.

Yours sincerely

Tim Brown

Records Administrator
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
2 Marlow Road
Maidenhead
Berkshire
SL6 7DX
Direct Line: 01628 507105

Keith at Tregenna


Hello Everybody

Just a brief note to let everyone I think may be interested know that I finally have a website for the Newport Docks records. I had a URL for the 70th Anniversary but the site could not be uploaded until the 4th.

In future I hope that it is updated month by month when possible.

I dont know if I will add the ports of origin and destination along with cargo because of the amount of work, but we shall see how it goes. The names of the ships and their fate will be my first consideration. The site does not appear on Google searches yet but I am assured it will do at some point in the near future.

I welcome any constructive criticism or correction for errors so that ultimately we have a website of some interest and worth. There is no need to respond to this email, and once again I thank everyone for their help. I am sure Keith for one has waited a long time to see this info put on line. PH.

http://www.ss-tregenna.co.uk/Pdf/Ghost%20Ships.pdf


http://www.newportswartimeshipping.info/index.htm

http://www.newportswartimeshipping.info/

I believe the ABOVE web site to be of immense value to Newport, Gwent, South Wales and is well worthy of being recommended to all. Peter has conducted some sterling work and some support is both deserved and am certain welcomed. Please look in and enjoy: KG.

Leeanne Harvey

Alf Tubb is my grandfather and I can remember him telling me this story about the cabin boy when I was very young. I'm so proud of him and his work with others to have this boy's death recognised and marked fittingly.

Its so sad and he was so young.
If a book is being written, may I have details sent to me so that I may purchase it. My e-mail address is leeanne.harvey@ntlworld.com
Thank you

Leeanne ( Alfred Tubb's eldest grandchild)


Billy McGee

The above statement dated 24th February by Keith regarding Fledgling Jason Steed is not from the books Author, it is taken from my book "They Shall Grow Not Old..." due to be published later this year.

Research undertaken by myself and others for my book and a request from survivor of the attack on the SS North Devon also reveals that young master Steed is not the youngest casualty as first believed. Although for now still officially recgonised by the CWGC the details of one Reginald Earnshaw have been forwarded to the Commission.

Reginald Earnshaw was commemorated on Tower Hill Memorial on Panel 74, which records all those who have no grave but the sea. Back in 2005 my attention was drawn to the fate of a young Reginald as one of the survivors from the attack named Alfred Tubbs who was serving as a DEMS gunner at the time remembers the body of Reginald being taken ashore at Immingham. The first thing to do was to trace a copy of the ships Log Book & Survivors Report for 1941 held at Kew, which was obtained by a contact of mine. Next a simple application with the General Register Office for a death certificate was made and within a week I had an official copy of his death certificate recorded at Cleethorpes reference 7a 1170., which proved his body had been landed ashore and examined as to be given a death certificate. The next phase was to find out where he was buried. A check of all burials in Grimsby and Cleethorpes for this period drew a blank so contact was made in Reginald's last place of abode in Edinburgh, which revealed he was buried in Edinburgh's Comely Bank Cemetery, Section P Grave Space 440. (Details from Edinburgh City Council Phone No 0131 664 4314 Morton hall Edinburgh) and was unmarked. A temporary cross baring his details was added and all documents were forwarded to the CWGC. Finally in 2008 our combined effort and findings were officially accepted by the CWGC and we are awaiting the erection of an official headstone. There was also some confusion of Reginalds age. The ships Log Book has his date of birth as 5th February 1926 in Dewsbury and his death certificate has him aged about 15. Only problem being there was no birth registered at Dewsbury for a Reginald Earnshaw in 1926, but there was one registered in Dewsbury in the March quarter 1927 in Volume 9b page 864. Having obtained a copy of the birth certificate, I can verify he was born the 5th February 1927, so the Log Book shows an error of exactly one year to the day, which made him 14 years 152days old when he was killed as to Raymond Steeds 14 years 207 days.

As a matter of urgency I informed the Treasurer of the Raymond Steed Memorial Fund, Mr. Tim Brant of the National MNA of these findings in the hope wording can be ammended to Raymond Steed's Memorial before it is finally erected.

Paul Flynn

Thanks very much Warren.

I know about the book but I have never read it. Could you give me details.

We have done well in Newport in remembering out heroes. Steed is one that we have neglected.

Warren Gilbert

Hello Mr Flynn
I read the book Fledgling Jason Steed. Its better than Harry Potter as its about a real local boy. Probably one of the best books I have read. I am 14 and could not imagine what it would be like for him going away so young. How did he do his school work?
I think its good we remember our heros. Those so young are even better.
Warren Gilbert 14

Keith at Tregenna


Fledgling Jason Steed

Is anyone aware of or indeed have read the book ? Would love to read comments. Cannot comment myself until I have both found and read a copy. K.

From THE AUTHOR:

In my Novel Fledgling Jason Steed. Jason's father is called Raymond Steed, he is a fictional naval officer and decorated hero. On the memorial / Veterans Day I would like to pay tribute the very real life hero:
Raymond Victor Steed, Youngest recorded service death of WWII

Raymond Victor Steed, Son of Mr. Wilfred & Mrs. Olive Steed (Nee Bright) of 20 Christchurch Road, Newport, Monmouthshire was born Monday 1st October 1928 at 2 Rimberley Terrace, St. Mellons, and is the youngest recorded service death of WWII who died Monday 26th April 1943. Age 14 years & 207 days.

Raymond's official service record (CRS10) shows he joined the Merchant Navy Reserve Pool (MNRP) 29th December 1942, just two months after his 14th birthday, joining his first ship as a Stewards Boy, at Newport the same day. The ship being the former Royal Mail Line 15,620grt SS Atlantis, which had been converted into a Hospital Ship in 1939. He left this ship 13th March 1943.

After taking his leave Raymond joined the 1941 built Catapult Aircraft Merchant Ship Empire Morn, 7,092grt, (MOWT, Headlam & Son-Whitby) at Newport on 4th April 1943. The ship loaded with a cargo of naval, military and RAF equipment for Casablanca & Gibraltar left Milford Haven sailing to the Barry Roads anchorage while waiting to join up with the combined 69 ship Convoy OS-46/KMS-13, which sailed from Liverpool on 15th April 1943. On 24th April the convoy split into two and continued to their individual ports of call.

On the evening of Monday 26th April at 9.45pm an explosion rocks the ship followed by a secondary explosion in the ships magazine seriously damaging the stern of the ship and blowing out a greater portion of the crew accommodation. At 10.05pm the Captain decides to temporarily abandon his ship until daybreak to assess the situation further. A thorough search and head count reveals 21 men are missing before the ships lifeboats are finally launched. The following morning at 5.30am the ship's Captain, all his Officers and three crewmen re-board the ship and assisted in working the vessel into Casablanca with the assistance of the salvage tug USN Cherokee.

On 28th April at 2.30pm during a further search through the wreckage of the crew accommodation the remains of two crewmembers were found and extricated and immediately recognized as that of Raymond Steed and John W. Gardener, an 18-year-old Ordinary Seaman. Identity papers found on both the bodies confirmed without doubt whom they were and it was stated that both had been killed instantly in the explosions. The remains of the other 19 men killed were never found, either being blown overboard or incinerated. On 29th April 1943 at 2.00pm the bodies of Raymond & John were laid to rest at the Ben M'Sik Cemetery about 6 kilometers from Casablanca town centre, which lies between the main road to Marrakech and the road known as Oulad Zianc. Present at the service was the Captain, all Officers and surviving crew who could be spared from duty.

German records show that the Empire Morn had detonated a mine laid earlier on 10th April 1943 off Casablanca by U-117. Raymond V. Steed was awarded the 1939 War Medal, Africa Star (with clasp). Atlantic Star & 1939-1945 Star.

Fictionreviewer.com

A coming of age heart wrenching story packed with laughs and fast paced action. Most readers who love action and spy fiction will devour this dynamic book in a single sitting or two, otherwise they’ll be in extreme agony waiting to see what happens next.

Preview the Book

Raymond V Steed is the real life hero and galley boy on a Merchant Navy ship when it was blown up and sunk after hitting a German mine off the African coast in 1943. The teenager from Newport was just 14 years and 207 days old when he died, five months after joining up. Raymond and 20 crew mates died in April 1943 after his ship, the Empire Morn, exploded after hitting a U-Boat mine near its destination of Casablanca, Morocco. He has been officially recognised by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission as the youngest recorded fatality of the British service war dead. Fictional character Jason Steed's father, Royal Navy Officer Raymond Steed and is remembered as a great British war hero.

Fledgling Jason Steed.

Fledgling Jason Steed Mark a Cooper Book Trailer - Video

http://www.metacafe.com/watch/1845837/fledgling_jason_steed_mark_a_cooper_book_trailer/

Not certain if released in UK as yet:

Keith at Tregenna


Fledgling Jason Steed

Is anyone aware of or indeed have read the book ? Would love to read comments. Cannot comment myself until I have both found and read a copy. K.

From THE AUTHOR:

In my Novel Fledgling Jason Steed. Jason's father is called Raymond Steed, he is a fictional naval officer and decorated hero. On the memorial / Veterans Day I would like to pay tribute the very real life hero:
Raymond Victor Steed, Youngest recorded service death of WWII

Raymond Victor Steed, Son of Mr. Wilfred & Mrs. Olive Steed (Nee Bright) of 20 Christchurch Road, Newport, Monmouthshire was born Monday 1st October 1928 at 2 Rimberley Terrace, St. Mellons, and is the youngest recorded service death of WWII who died Monday 26th April 1943. Age 14 years & 207 days.

Raymond's official service record (CRS10) shows he joined the Merchant Navy Reserve Pool (MNRP) 29th December 1942, just two months after his 14th birthday, joining his first ship as a Stewards Boy, at Newport the same day. The ship being the former Royal Mail Line 15,620grt SS Atlantis, which had been converted into a Hospital Ship in 1939. He left this ship 13th March 1943.

After taking his leave Raymond joined the 1941 built Catapult Aircraft Merchant Ship Empire Morn, 7,092grt, (MOWT, Headlam & Son-Whitby) at Newport on 4th April 1943. The ship loaded with a cargo of naval, military and RAF equipment for Casablanca & Gibraltar left Milford Haven sailing to the Barry Roads anchorage while waiting to join up with the combined 69 ship Convoy OS-46/KMS-13, which sailed from Liverpool on 15th April 1943. On 24th April the convoy split into two and continued to their individual ports of call.

On the evening of Monday 26th April at 9.45pm an explosion rocks the ship followed by a secondary explosion in the ships magazine seriously damaging the stern of the ship and blowing out a greater portion of the crew accommodation. At 10.05pm the Captain decides to temporarily abandon his ship until daybreak to assess the situation further. A thorough search and head count reveals 21 men are missing before the ships lifeboats are finally launched. The following morning at 5.30am the ship's Captain, all his Officers and three crewmen re-board the ship and assisted in working the vessel into Casablanca with the assistance of the salvage tug USN Cherokee.

On 28th April at 2.30pm during a further search through the wreckage of the crew accommodation the remains of two crewmembers were found and extricated and immediately recognized as that of Raymond Steed and John W. Gardener, an 18-year-old Ordinary Seaman. Identity papers found on both the bodies confirmed without doubt whom they were and it was stated that both had been killed instantly in the explosions. The remains of the other 19 men killed were never found, either being blown overboard or incinerated. On 29th April 1943 at 2.00pm the bodies of Raymond & John were laid to rest at the Ben M'Sik Cemetery about 6 kilometers from Casablanca town centre, which lies between the main road to Marrakech and the road known as Oulad Zianc. Present at the service was the Captain, all Officers and surviving crew who could be spared from duty.

German records show that the Empire Morn had detonated a mine laid earlier on 10th April 1943 off Casablanca by U-117. Raymond V. Steed was awarded the 1939 War Medal, Africa Star (with clasp). Atlantic Star & 1939-1945 Star.

Fictionreviewer.com

A coming of age heart wrenching story packed with laughs and fast paced action. Most readers who love action and spy fiction will devour this dynamic book in a single sitting or two, otherwise they’ll be in extreme agony waiting to see what happens next.

Preview the Book

Raymond V Steed is the real life hero and galley boy on a Merchant Navy ship when it was blown up and sunk after hitting a German mine off the African coast in 1943. The teenager from Newport was just 14 years and 207 days old when he died, five months after joining up. Raymond and 20 crew mates died in April 1943 after his ship, the Empire Morn, exploded after hitting a U-Boat mine near its destination of Casablanca, Morocco. He has been officially recognised by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission as the youngest recorded fatality of the British service war dead. Fictional character Jason Steed's father, Royal Navy Officer Raymond Steed and is remembered as a great British war hero.

Fledgling Jason Steed.

Fledgling Jason Steed Mark a Cooper Book Trailer - Video

http://www.metacafe.com/watch/1845837/fledgling_jason_steed_mark_a_cooper_book_trailer/

Not certain if released in UK as yet:

Keith at Tregenna


THE RAYMOND STEED MEMORIAL FUND

DETAILS:

Now posted on:

http://www.ss-tregenna.co.uk/Pdf/other_ships.htm.pdf

http://www.ss-tregenna.co.uk/

"A memorial to Raymond would honour not only him but all the seamen who were
killed in the war.”

"It would also be a fitting tribute to the sacrifices made by those unsung heroes who
died on all convoys in all wars."

KEITH AT TREGENNA

We were pleased to recieve the updte of today and wish all well in the fund raising - please contact us direct if we can be of assistance and will certainly premote all and attempt to asssist in the raising of funda etc.

Honour bid for youngest war hero

The bravery of a 14-year-old boy, the youngest from Britain to die serving in World War II, should be remembered say campaigners.

Raymond Steed was a galley boy on a Merchant Navy ship when it was blown up after hitting a German mine off the African coast in 1943.

The teenager from Newport was just 14 years and 207 days old when he died, five months after joining up. Merchant Navy Association officials now want a statue erected in his honour.

Raymond and 20 crew mates died in April 1943 after his ship, the Empire Morn, exploded after hitting a U-Boat mine near its destination of Casablanca, Morocco. His body was recovered and buried in the Ben M'Sik military cemetery near the city, alongside him lays British Field Marshal Sir Claude Auchinleck – just as the Field Marshal requested.

He has been officially recognised by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission as the youngest recorded fatality of the British service war dead.

Joining in December 1942, he served on the hospital ship Atlantis where he was awarded the Africa Star with clasp during Operation Torch when Allied troops landed on the beaches of North Africa. Then he transferred to the freighter Empire Morn as it set off in convoy from Milford Haven for Gibraltar and Casablanca where it was hit.

Merchant Navy Association officials are now fundraising for the money needed for a statue in honour of Raymond in Newport.
Vice-president of the association Bertram Bale, 75, said:

"A memorial to Raymond would honour not only him but all the seamen who were killed in the war.”

"It would also be a fitting tribute to the sacrifices made by those unsung heroes who died on all convoys in all wars."

"Let those who come after see to it that his name be not forgotten".

Her Name Was Tregenna is a site created as a tribute to Captain Care of Barry and the men of one particular ship, though it now carries additional material.

http://www.ss-tregenna.co.uk/

www.ss-tregenna.co.uk

hernamewas.ss@tiscali.co.uk

mnawalesbarrybranch@tiscali.co.uk

hernamewas.ss@googlemail.com

kgmaritime.research@googlemail.com

http://www.barrymerchantseamen.org.uk

We Remember Raymond Victor Steed and all of the good men and boys of the British Merchant Navy.

"Lest we Forget"


paulflynn

The plans for a bronze statue are proceeding well. It is hoped that an announcement giving full details can be made in the Autumn.

A fund has been established and contributions are greatly appreciated. They should be sent to Tim Brandt, The Raymond Steed Memorial Fund, 9 Saxon Way Caistor Market Rasen, LN7 6SG

Keith at Tregenna

A posting on the Merchant Navy Looking for Old Friends web site enquires: Some time ago there was an interest in the raising of a memorial to the memory of Galley Boy Raymond Victor Steed SS Empire Morn.

Raymond was age 14 and the youngest WW2 service death. Has there been any further developments ?. David H.

We also would love an update, although involved since the original conception of the project by Mr. Billy McGee and one of many interested parties we still offer all assistance and all good wishes with the end result. We would like to pass on an update to all that enquire etc. Keith at Tregenna

http://www.ss-tregenna.co.uk/

www.ss-tregenna.co.uk

hernamewas.ss@tiscali.co.uk

Keith Greenway

Sir, we thank you for your prompt response and update and ask only that we be kept informed, It is good to hear that things are going well - to plan etc and that Newport will remember. We are delighted to know that this venture will go as far as the House of Commons in it's initial stages and that further progress for this ambitious proposal may be announced soon.

We although in the background are an interested and concerned body and wish Newport well in it's intention.

We shall convey the message to all interested parties and offer our continued support. We have no doubt that Nationally, the interest in Master Steed, will highlight the plight of the many youngsters, if not all of the "Forgotten Service" and within the term "LEST WE FORGET" we mean all. In mewmory of the combined services of our "Island Nation"

We re-iterate our thanks, and remain yours in good faith - all at "Tregenna". KG.

paulflynn

Thanks for your message

A committee is established and fundraising has started. A request has been made to the Council for discussion on the site of what is hoped will be a bronze statue. The person who has produced similar sculptures in the city has been contacted and provided a rough estimate of costs.

We are hoping for a prime site can be found in the new developments that are taking place. The committee are very optimistic that further progress for this ambitious proposal can be announced soon.

Perhaps you will let me have the details of the many inquiries you have had and I will be happy to contact them directly. I assure you that the proposal is progressing very well. There are good reasons why we have avoided publicity until we have a site that is assured. My intention is to launch the campaign with an Early Day Motion in the House of Commons.

Keith Greenway

Dear sir,

AS you know we at the "Tregenna" website are and have been deeply involved with the remembrance of Master Raymond Victor Steed. We were involved since commencement,from the original request and superb work of Mr. Billy McGee whom highighted the need to remember Raymond.

We have waited patiently, for news as to a memorial and were led to believe that although at the time, Newport resembled a building site, that something temporary would occur. EG: a simple tablet / plate and that we would be advised of further plans etc.

We have heard nothing new via press / officials / yourself or eminent bodies and ask for an update from your self.

As a matter of National importance, We ask for a simple statement from a patron of the main body concerned, as nothing else seems to have been released. We are not the only intertested party and although media coverage was well recieved last year, Many seek a response and an update, for fear that Newport will simply forget.

This is to big an issue for those that choose to remember amn a statement of intent is required from youi personaly, this to ensure rembrance deserved and to appease the many enquirers that we have.

We only ask as a concerned and interested party and on behalf of the many in Wales, that have been in contact with us for further information.

As you can imagine last years media coverage crreted much interest and although a waiting preiod was advocated, we are becoming inundated with requests for updates and information etc.

As our original contact on this matter, an MP and patron etc, we ask you for a personal update. You seemed so closely connected to the original request that it seems natural to ask you personally for an update.

Thank you in advance for your every assitance and help in this and hopefiully, a knowledgable and fast respone. Regards Keith at "Tregenna"

Her Name Was Tregenna is a site created as a tribute to Captain William Thomas Care of Barry, South Wales and the men of one particular ship, though it now carries additional material.

http://www.ss-tregenna.co.uk/

www.ss-tregenna.co.uk

hernamewas.ss@tiscali.co.uk

Keith Greenway

HER NAME WAS TREGENNA Web Site vows first fifty pound pledge to this worthy remembrance. Please Newport show you care and that you remember and follow with your donations when the fund begins.

Tregenna is an historical tribute to a vessel captained by William Thomas Care from Barry. He was one of thirty-three people killed when the ship was torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine near Rockall in 1940.

The S.S. TREGENNA was a 5,242 GRT steamer, built in 1919, but torpedoed and sunk by a U-Boat U-65 on 19th September 1940 whilst in convoy between Philadelphia and Newport, Wales. This website is a tribute to the S.S. TREGENNA and her crew, only 4 of whom survived the attack. It also records the irony that within little more than 7 months, the U-65 would herself be sunk by a British destroyer, HMS DOUGLAS. One of hundreds of British merchant ships sent to the bottom during World War 2, this website gives a lot of useful information, facts and figures about the sinking of the S.S. TREGENNA, recording for history, the actual, real people behind the statistics.

SS Tregenna
http://www.ss-tregenna.co.uk

Recently awarded a silver maritime awardHer Name Was ss. is a tribute to Captain Care of Barry and his crew of the SS. Tregenna, her survivors, relatives and all in peril on the sea.


Paul Flynn

Thanks.

I'm glad to see the interest is erecting a memorial to Master Steed. I will be happy to contribute but all donations I make are strictly confidential and anonymous. My first concern is that the cost mentioned may be very optimistic. It is not just the cost of he memorial, but the costs of a plinth and surroundings that are very expensive. Probably the local Merchant Navy Association are best placed to organise this and find a site. I have no doubt that a substantial sum of money can be raised as the City of Newport is proud of its Merchant Navy history and raised a memorial to Merchant Seaman where a commemoration is held each year on the 11th November.

As I mentioned earlier, for ten years I lived next door to the Steed family who probaly included the mother and brother of Master Steed so I have a great interest in this.

Keith Greenway

Sir,

As have mentioned previously Mr Billy McGee, whom is well respected in both Merchant Navy and Internet circles is in the early stages regarding a ( statue ) memorial. He has been contacted recently by Bert Bale, Chairman of the Merchant Navy Association Newport Branch who has made contact with one of Raymond’s relatives and he is awaiting a phone call with hopefully more news. Mr. Mike Buckingham, who works for the South Wales Argus ( Newport) contacted him of late and was given all details, this is I have been informed has gone to print and I hope to receive a copy by post soon, This I will be pass onto Mr. McGee.

Regarding the memorial idea itself. The last two large ones Billy helped raise funds for cost around £1700. They were both made from raised bronze 900mm x 600mm weighing around 60 kilo. One was mounted to a cemetery gate-post and the other mounted into a 3 ton piece of stone. He is thinking along the lines of a marble piece and if a decent enough photograph of Raymond can be found, this would be intended to be inserted into the plaque. He would still like to make some contact with the relatives before taking the next step, which would be needed to set up a fund. This he has also had previous experience of with when helping open the Bidadari Memorial Fund and later the Ropner Navy Memorial Fund, this was through the Lloyds TSB.

We at The Her Name Was SS. Tregenna Web Site, are involved wholeheartedly with tribute to those that have no known grave but the sea, The ships the crews, the families, the loved ones and those that died to help save us all. We do not entertain any monies towards our costs. However, may we be the first to offer £50.00 to the account as soon as opened and be the first to commence donations to such a fund. LEST WE FORGET. This from our own pockets. We appeal to all to do the same. Mr. Flynn to lead the way, The Argus to contribute, The people of Newport and indeed Wales to dig deep and all politicians, councillors, Newport’s Mayor and the Welsh Assembly to prove that we both remember and care.

AND EVERY CITIZEN, BUSINESS OR ORGANISATION.

Newport, Wales and all remember those that perished and give a little back, so they shall always be remembered, especially, the 14 year old Master Steed, of Newport.

Newport,s never to be forgotten hero.

hernamewas.ss@tiscali.co.uk

www.ss-tregenna.co.uk

Keith Greenway

I HAVE TAKEN THE LIBERTY OF POSTING BILLY MCGEES MESSAGE AS I FEEL IT TO BE IMPORTANT FOR NEWPORT, LEST WE FORGET.

Looking for any relatives of the young lad below.

STEED, Galley Boy, RAYMOND VICTOR, S.S. "Empire Morn" (Barrow-in-Furness). Merchant Navy. 26th April 1943. Age 14. Son of Wilfed & Olive Steed (nee Bright) of 20 Christchurch Road, Newport, Monmouthshire. Buried Ben M'Sik Cemetery. Plot 59A. Row 1. Grave 1.

Raymond V. Steed is the youngest known Second World War service death, killed on his second trip to sea.

I have been researching the short sea life of Raymond and have copies of his sea service and copies of the official Log Book report into his death along with 20 other crewmembers of the Empire Morn.

I believe Raymond may of had 5 brothers and 3 sister's, one of the sisters who may have been named after him "Raye V. Steed" born 1943 shortly after his death. I have a photo of Raymond taken from his Seaman's ID, which is of poor quality and I am looking for a decent photograph. I also have a photo of his war grave in Morocco (see Brian's historical picture page).

This is in the very early stages, but I am hoping to have a memorial erected in memory of Raymond, if I can raise sufficient interest and funding. The idea is again to raise awareness of our Merchant Navy war dead as well as highlighting just how young some of these boys were.

Possible Brothers & Sisters of Raymond, born in Newport:

1922 STEED Marie D.
1924 STEED Sylvia F.
1926 STEED Wilfred L.
1928 STEED Raymond V.
1932 STEED Kenneth A.
1934 STEED Clifford J.
1936 STEED Edward J.
1943 STEED Raye V.
1945 STEED Graham R.

Billy McGee

PLEASE CONTACT US AT :

hernamewas.ss@tiscali.co.uk

www.ss-tregenna.co.uk

WE WILL PUT ANY LIKE MINDED PEOPLE IN TOUCH WITH BILL. A STATUE REMBERING THIS LAD IS A MUST. KEITH

Keith Greenway

Update on Newport’s
They may as well have been ghost ships
http://www.ss-tregenna.co.uk/

In his letter to the editor of the Argus, Newport, Gwent, Wales early in 2007: Peter Hackling of Pontywaun, Crosskeys, placed a request for help which he believes to be important to Newport's history. This was in regard to Newport Docks Wartime Records. Peter stated “All the wartime ships (Merchant Navy) that visited Newport Docks, may as well have been ghost ships, because I cannot find these records in any establishment locally or nationally”, Peter described this as to Newport's shame.

We at Her Name Was .SS Web Site wish to aid Peter with his research, we look toward making all records public and also graphically by using Merchant Ships outlines, with colour coded detail representing every year of the war to demonstrate the dreadful losses, show the ships that used the port and the fates of such vessels.

We have had by chance a bit of luck of late with Associated British Ports, NEWPORT
They recently acknowledged our email requesting information and have advised that they have handwritten logbooks of the arrival and sailing of all vessels (including Merchant, Royal Navy and American) through Alexandra Dock, Newport during 1939, 1940, 1941, 1942 & 1944. They do not, however hold lists of personnel on board these vessels as this data has never been given to, or held by the port authority.
They further invited “Tregenna” to visit the Port to view the logbooks, Our fellow researcher and quest originator Peter Hackling, has both been in contact and made several visits. Also, John Harrold, again from the Newport area has contacted us with the following :


“All of my records are now in the Newport Library's reference section. In those records are details of all the ships that came to and from the South Wales ports, including Bristol, for both World Wars. Also there is a lot of other information of shipping going back several hundred years. These records include merchant and Royal navy disasters along the whole of the Bristol Channel covering an area from Bristol to Ilfracombe across to Lundy Island and from there to Milford Haven.

Some of the stories which I wrote up are published in the Nautical Magazine, from Glasgow, Scotland”.

This again is being looked into, we know that David Simpson is doing some sterling work in Barry and hope to aid him in his research, this he has undertaken in an attempt to continue the work of the late Fred Hortop. David went to sea himself at the age of 15 in 1940.

Please contact us at hernamewas.ss@tiscali.co.uk we intend to make the results available to all. Following similar requests for Cardiff and Barry Docks Wartime Records, we ask for any information on all Welsh ports. Recent requests also include all Irish Merchant Seamen and war losses and from the town of Kinsale and County of Cork in particular. We shall give these our full attention and report again ASAP.

We further hope that if Terry Breverton does follow up his book "Welsh Sailors of the Second World War" That he may include much of our information in tribute in such a fellow up. With special mentions to these records of Welsh Ports, Ships and Seamen and a possible chapter or so on Irish losses.

Keith, Paul and Peter

hernamewas.ss@tiscali.co.uk

KIeith Greenway

RE: STEED, Galley Boy, RAYMOND VICTOR, S.S. "Empire Morn" (Barrow-in-Furness).

Sir, please contact me by e.mail.
Mr Billy McGee is leading a campaign to remember this young man, WITH A STAUE IN MIND and we have PLANS TO HONOUR HIM AND OTHERS WITHIN OUR WORK. Billy McGee would be pleased to liase with you. Keith.

Paul Flynn

That's great. Thanks for the response. It's touching that the casualty was so young. There was another very young victim of war in Newport. He was poisoned with mustard gas, playing on a old training ground at Maesglas in 1943. I would be very surprised if we do not find living relatives of Raymond Victor Steed - Galley Boy.

Keith Greenway

RE : Looking for any relatives of the young lad below.

STEED, Galley Boy, RAYMOND VICTOR, S.S. "Empire Morn" (Barrow-in-Furness).

Under a working title of They may as well be ghost ships, we at the Tregenna Web site are aiding research with Peter Hackling of Pontywaun, Crosskeys, whom requested our help for what he believes to be an important part of Newport's history. This was in regard to Newport Docks Wartime Records. Peter stated “All the wartime ships (Merchant Navy) that visited Newport Docks, may as well have been ghost ships, because I cannot find these records in any establishment locally or nationally”, Peter described this as to Newport's shame.

We at Her Name Was.SS Web Site are aiding Peter with his research, we look toward making all records public and also graphically by using Merchant Ships outlines, with colour coded detail representing every year of the war to demonstrate the dreadful losses, show the ships that used the port and the fates of such vessels with percentages, highlighting the fates of such ladies of the sea, whether by air attack, torpedo mine and those that survived etc.

Please contact us at hernamewas.ss@tiscali.co.uk with any info, we are not in the statue league but can certainly record all details and feature the young man. Working closely with Peter, we intend to make the results available to all. This will remain ongoing until complete. Following similar requests for Cardiff and Barry Docks Wartime Records, we ask for any information on all Welsh ports.

Thanks to all, especially Brian and this site for promoting our request. All information will be presented to the Cities Fathers, Mayor etc and Newport Branch MNA etc. With all on display at Newport’s reference library. NOT QUITE YOUR OBJECTIVE, IT IS OURS AND HAVE ROOM FOR SPECIAL MENTIONS AND REMEMBRANCES ETC.

If we can spearhead the way with any kind of public awareness project we will, but are not in the position to make promises.

IF YOU WISH FOR US TO TRY, PLEASE REPLY, ALWAYS TRYING TO DO OUR BIT, LEST WE FORGET. KEITH.

A mention within our own work, will be no problem. But require some if not all of the info you have. Will send details of our quest onto Billy. Need all help possible. Thanks again to Brian for a foot up. Results so far are better than expected at such an early stage and we will update you all ASAP. Regards Keith @ Tregenna.

Keith, Paul and Peter

http://www.ss-tregenna.co.uk/

hernamewas.ss@tiscali.co.uk

Mark Vane

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